What does Content Matching allow me to do?

Using this feature on for an element allows you take advantage of additional evaluation logic which can help reduce test failure rates. This is done by taking in to account not only an element's exact visual appearance but also the explicit text-based content contained within an element.

This means in scenarios where a test might fail because of superficial changes, it could pass if its text content remained the same.

When should I use Content Matching?

Let’s use the example below. Say your working on a redesign of a shopping cart feature based on your product’s new brand style.

The initial button on the left is a captured element in one of your current tests and is in your interface’s old style. The button on the right is an updated version which has a new visual design that your team is preparing to release.

If Content Matching is enabled, for tests that contain the initial button, they would pass by detecting that the element’s text content and behavior haven't changed even though it's visual styling is no longer an exact match.

This is useful when your QA strategy is more focused on testing implicit functionality over strict appearance and want to avoid managing test failures for small non-critical changes.

In the test cases where Content Matching is not enabled, the updated button would result in a test failure. Due to the fact that its appearance doesn’t exactly match the initial button.

Not using Content Matching is a perfectly acceptable practice, and is encouraged if your team values very rigid tests.

You may switch Content Matching on and off at the individual element level if there is content to match. This can be done for buttons, headers, various amounts of text. Rainforest Automation will automatically determine if Content Matching is feasible for your selected element. In the following example, when the "Start your Free 14 Day Trial" was selected, RA determined that Context Matching could be used for future test evaluations. You however can set it so it does not use Content Matching. If you change your mind and switch back and forth on using Content Matching as you see fit.

No text to evaluate

No valid text content could be found

If you’ve received this message don’t worry, nothing has gone wrong. This simply means that no recognizable text content could be detected by our system in the captured element. This will happen with graphics, logos etc. and other elements that don't have easily discernible text. In this instance, Context Matching will not be used and there is not an option to engage it. Over time our detection logic will improve and cover a wider range of cases. If you believe however that there is an issue please let us know at support@rainforestqa.com.

Too much text to evaluate

The text content found was too detailed.

If you’ve received this message it means that the element you have captured has too many distinct parts of text. In order to preserve accuracy, Content Matching works best with single chunks of text, rather than multiple occurrences within a single captured element. In this instance, Context Matching will not be used and there is not an option to engage it. Instead of grabbing a large piece of the screen, try several smaller if that still satisfies your test case. If you believe however that there is an issue please let us know at support@rainforestqa.com.

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